Breast Implants and ALCL

BIA-ALCL is breast implant associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma, a cancer of the immune system caused by breast implants. It is generally found in fluid collection in between the implant and capsule, in a seroma, or in a nodule in the capsule. Physical signs are effusion, swelling, pain, inflammation, mass, ulceration, and others. The overwhelming symptoms in a majority of patients is a delayed seroma, persistent swelling, and pain. While even more rare some patients may present skin changes, lymphadenopathy, capsular contracture, or a potentially palpable mass.1 CD30 is the diagnostic test being used to distinguish ALCL. It is found to occur at a much higher rate in textured breast implants, however there have been some smooth surfaced breast implant cases as well.

Risks:

“The current lifetime risk of BIA-ALCL in the U.S. is estimated to be 1:30,000 women with textured implants based upon current confirmed cases and textured implant sales data over the past two decades. This is consistent with risk reported in Europe.

Certain geographic locations have demonstrated variable risks. For instance, a December 2016 update from the Therapeutic Goods Administration of Australia and New Zealand reported a risk of 1:1,000 to 1:10,000 for textured implants.” – Dr. Mark Clemens

Allergan textured breast implants (old and new) have a 1:3,500 average incidence rate from studies in the U.S. and Australia.

Medical Device Reports of Breast Implants in Women with ALCL – FDA

Update: As of July 2017, Dr. Mark Clemens states the FDA has received 464 adverse event reports in relation to BIA-ALCL and 12 deaths. See here for his report.

As of February 2017, the FDA has received a total of 359 medical device reports (MDRs) of breast-implant-associated ALCL, including nine deaths. Out of those 359 total reports, only 64% (231 reports) listed data on the surface at the time of reporting:

  • 87% (203 out of the 231 report) were with textured surfaces
  • 12% (28 out of the 231 reports) were with smooth surfaces

Although it is rare, breast-implant-associated ALCL appears to develop more frequently in women with textured implants than in women with smooth-surfaced implants.

Sample of the FDA Adverse Reaction Reports on BIA-ALCL:

Note: Parentheses represent redacted information to protect privacy.

1. Company rep reported right side anaplastic large-cell lymphoma and “subcutaneous nodules and lymph nodes. ” the pt had a bilateral reconstruction seven years ago with style 410 breast implant placed on the left side and a style 115 placed on the right side. The pt had done well until she presented last week with a pathology report from her oncologist stating that she had alcl. The pt stated that she had nodules on the right axilla. A pet scan was carried out that showed metastasis in the lung and bone marrow involvement. No seroma was noted. The oncologist has decided on her treatment plan to exclude radiation. Explant surgery will take place (b)(6) 2013. (Reported in 2013, Allergan silicone) Link.

2. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the breast arising around mammary implant capsule: an (b)(6) report written in aesthetic plastic surgery 2013 reports alcl, seroma, pain. Additional information noted in article anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the breast arising around mammary implant capsule: an italian report written in aesthetic plastic surgery 2013 article notes in regards to the right side, “necrosis and chronic inflammation signs are present” and “skin above the implant became red and painful and the patient had febrile episodes. ” treatment noted for the event of seroma as “a broad-spectrum antibiotic. ” (Reported in 2013, Allergan silicone) Link.

3. Healthcare professional reports a case of lymphoma and other b-symptoms via mw (b)(4) the mw notes that: “the reporter called on behalf of a pt who was diagnosed with alcl. The pt presented with anaplastic large cell lymphoma, diagnosed in 2013. History of hodgkin’s lymphoma diagnosed in 2011. These two events came about after the pt underwent breast augmentation in 1994. In 2010, pt presented with an abnormal mammogram performed in 2010. Breast pain, skin color change, skin texture change, and inflowing diffusion form the right breast up to right neck and shoulder. The pt was running a fever throughout the entire process. After an mri and subsequent test, the pt was diagnosed with hodgkin’s lymphoma and underwent mantle radiation. In 2012, the pt underwent surgery essentially for a breast mass, but the pt also desired a mastectomy for removal of right and left implants and capsules. The pathology of the operation soon reported that the pt also has alcl; the mass had come from the lymphoma. ” (Reported in 2013, Allergan saline) Link.

4. Pt is a female who underwent left mastectomy in 1996, for ductal carcinoma in situ with tissue expanders and saline implant reconstruction. She presented in 2010, with a peri-implant hematoma, though possibly post-traumatic. She underwent evacuation of the hematoma and change to a silicone gel implant. All pathology specimens were negative for tumor. She again presented in 2012, with a spontaneous hematoma and at surgery multiple biopsies revealed anaplastic large cell lymphoma (alcl) limited to the periprosthetic capsule and hematoma fluid. After an extensive hematologic and metastatic workup which was negative, she underwent removal of the implant and total periprosthetic capsulectomy. Capsular pathology showed alcl. (Reported in 2012, Mentor silicone) Link.

5. On (b)(6) 2010, diagnosed with anaplastic large cell lymphoma (alcl) alk-negative. Possibly related or caused by breast implants received in (b)(6) 2002 for augmentation. Experienced complications with left implant diagnosed as capsular contraction. Implant replaced on (b)(6) 2008. Still experiencing capsular contraction after replacement. (b)(6) 2010 – (b)(6) 2011: received 12 doses of chemotherapy, received 20 doses of radiation therapy. Preparing for stem cell transplant scheduled for (b)(6) 2011. (b)(6) 2010: needle biopsy – diagnosis lymphoma. (b)(6) 2010: surgical biopsy – diagnosis alcl. (b)(6) 2010: surgical biopsy – diagnosis alcl. (Reported in 2011, Allergan saline) Link.

6. The original purchase date of this device was (b)(6)2004. In (b)(6) 2006, the pt was implanted with mentor siltex saline devices during a revision augmentation procedure. In (b)(6) 2008, the devices were replaced with mentor smooth saline devices due to a left device deflation. In (b)(6) 2010, the pt had both implants removed due to recurring fluid accumulation in the right breast. On (b)(6)2010, the pt was diagnosed with alcl (t-cell lymphoma). No further info is available at this time. (Reported in 2010, Mentor saline) Link.

Above is only a sample of six reports to the FDA. As of July 2017, Dr. Mark Clemens states the FDA has received 464 adverse event reports in relation to BIA-ALCL and 12 deaths. Join the Facebook group ALCL in Women with Breast Implants BIA-ALCL to view reports by country.

BIA-ALCL Cause:

The cause is still unknown but is actively being studied. Some researchers have theorized that biofilm contributes to lymphoma and others have thought the chemicals in the implants irritate the immune system. Both theories rely on the presence of persistent inflammation, which means chronic activation of immune cells and particularly the T lymphocytes, which are blood cells involved with ALCL.

Throughout the body, there are many diverse populations of bacteria that are both beneficial and harmful. In recent years, there has been an increased focus in characterizing bacteria and analyzing patterns of bacteria to understand the possible correlation between normal versus infectious/cancerous scenarios – especially in relation to breast cancer. What has been discovered is that similar to how the gut has its own microbiome of good and bad bacteria, the normal breast tissue and human milk also have their own microbiology that over time is influenced by factors such as dietary and sugar changes. The article “Microbiota of the Human Breast Tissue” delves into the various specific bacteria that were found in human breasts. Since breasts are not sterile, if a foreign object is placed inside the body, it will be colonized and infected.

Biofilm is bacteria that adheres to the surfaces of medical devices. It can result in a low grade chronic bacterial infection, chronic inflammation, and capsular contracture. Some bacteria produce acid as they grow and this reduces the pH of the surrounding environment. In the closed off space between the surface of the implant and the inner capsule surface, the bacteria coating the implant could form an acidic environment that contributes potentially to the breakdown of silicone. Australian researchers found that biofilm from capsular contracture cases was different from the biofilm identified on 26 implants from lymphoma patients. This brings biolfim to light as “a possible infectious contributing cause” for the lymphoma.

The chemicals used in the manufacturing process, which are neurotoxic and carcinogenic, are also believed to be playing a role in the development of lymphoma. The majority of ALCL cases have been found with textured implants, the roughness of the surface is triggering chronic inflammation. Textured implants were designed to keep the implants in place, thus, the capsules embed themselves on and around the textured surface. This creates an intimate, hand in hand connection between the scar tissue and chemically abrasive textured surface. Over time, this can lead to a direct abrasive irritation of the immune system, significantly affecting T cells.

It is interesting to note the connection between polyurethane coated implants and textured implants. Polyurethane coated implants were the first type of breast implant linked to cancer, and textured implants have now become the second type of breast implant linked to cancer – what they both have in common is a chemically abrasive fuzzy surface. Polyurethane implants were in production from about 1980 to when the manufacturer voluntarily withdrew them in 1991 due to significant safety concerns. These implants were the precursors to the textured breast implants since the textured surface was thought to be important in reducing capsular contracture and firmness, but the implant manufacturers could not use polyurethane so instead they created the textured surface currently manufactured today (since the mid-1990’s). This textured surface is also linked to an increased occurrence of forming double capsules (scar tissue surrounding the implants) and seromas, thereby going against its intended purpose.1,2

Current BIA-ALCL Researchers:

  • Dr. Mark Clemens (US)
  • Dr. Suzanne Turner (UK)
  • Dr. Anand Deva (Australia)

Protocol: 

(Sources: First image is from here and the second image is from Dr. Clemens Webinar)

Scientific Articles: 

PSEN Breast Implant Associated Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (2017). Link.

United States Epidemiology of Breast Implant-Associated Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (2017). Link.

Breast implant associated Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma in Australia and New Zealand – high surface area textured implants are associated with increased risk (2017). Link.

Breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (2016). Link.

Diagnosis and Management of BIA-ALCL (2016). Link.

BIA-ALCL, The French National Cancer Institute Expert Opinion (2016). Link.

A further case report from the United Kingdom of breast implant associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL) and a reason to avoid the sub pectoral plane (2016). Link.

Breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma: two distinct clinicopathological variants with different outcomes (2016). Link.

Marked eosinophilia as initial presentation of breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (2016). Link.

  • Scar capsule around breast implant must be removed if you want it insure you don’t have problems years later, including BIA-ALCL Here is a case of BIA-ALCL years after implants were removed.

MSCs and inflammation: new insights into the potential association between ALCL and breast implants (2016). Link.

Biomarkers Provide Clues to Early Events in the Pathogenesis of Breast Implant-Associated Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (2016). Link.

Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals Activating JAK1 And STAT3 Mutations In Breast Implant-Associated Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (2016). Link.

Axillary Lymphadenopathy: An Outstanding Presentation for Breast Implant-Associated ALK-Negative Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (2015). Link.

Effusion-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the breast: time for it to be defined as a distinct clinics-pathological entity (2010). Link.

Complete surgical excision is essential for management of patients with breast implant-associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (2016). Link.

Bacterial biofilm infection detected in breast implant–associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (2016). Link.

Marked eosinophilia as initial presentation of breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (2016). Link.

Breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma: a systematic review (2015). Link.

Recurrent systemic anaplastic lymphoma kinase-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma presenting as a breast implant-associated lesion (2015). Link.

The non-specific symptoms of breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma resulting in delayed diagnosis: a case-based review (2015). Link.

CD30 expression in de novo diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: a population-based study from British Columbia (2014). Link.

  • The significant association of CD30 with EBV-positive non-GCB DLBCL suggests a distinct pathobiology for these cases.

Breast implant-associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma: long-term follow-up of 60 patients (2013). Link.

Implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the breast: insight into a poorly understood disease (2013). Link.

Breast implant associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma: a case report and reconstructive option (2013). Link.

Breast implant-associated ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma: a case report and discussion of possible pathogenesis (2013). Link.

Anaplastic large cell lymphoma, ALK-negative (2013). Link.

Chemotherapy-resistant breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (2013). Link.

Breast implant-associated ALCL: a unique entity in the spectrum of CD3o+ lymphoproliferative disorders (2012). Link.

Survival Signals and Targets for Therapy in Breast Implant–Associated ALK− Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (2012). Link.

Primary anaplastic large-cell lymphoma associated with breast implants (2012). Link.

Anaplastic large cell lymphoma involving the breast: a clfinicopathologic study of 6 cases and review of the literature (2009). Link.

Primary and secondary T-cell lymphomas of the breast: clinico-pathologic features of 11 cases (2009). Link. 

  • One case presented mastitis but was lymphoma

Primary anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the breast arising in reconstruction mammoplasty capsule of saline filled breast implant after radical mastectomy for breast cancer: an unusual case presentation (2009). Link.

Rare lymphoid malignancies of the breast: a report of two cases illustrating potential diagnostic pitfalls (2000). Link.

Understanding rare adverse sequelae of breast implants: anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, late seromas, and double capsules (2016). Link.

Seroma-associated primary anaplastic large-cell lymphoma adjacent to breast implants: an indolent T-Cell lymphoproliferative disorder (2008). Link.

Malignant lymphoma and breast implants: a case of diffuse large b-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) with implant-near relapse localization (2010). Link.

Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma associated with silicone breast implant, HLA-DRB1*11:01, and HLA-DQB1*03:01 manifesting as macrophage activation syndrome and with severe neurological symptoms: a case report (2016). Link.

Anaplastic large-cell lymphomas of B-cell phenotype are anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) negative and belong to the spectrum of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (2000). Link.

Report:

If you have or have had breast implants and have been diagnosed with ALCL, please fill out the two reports below:

Resources: